Tag Archives: Kam Wing Chan

Prof Chan’s proposal on hukou reforms.

Here, at UrbaChina, we have already presented Prof. Kam Wing Chan’s proposals on possible Hukou reforms.

On December 17, the Wall Street Journal1 interviewed Prof Chan (University of Washington) on the reasons why hukou system needs to be liberalized.

the-paulson-institute-logo

 

Prof Chan’s full report on Hukou reforms can be dowloaded at the Paulson Institute.

  1. China’s closed cities threaten population goals, report says. Wall Street Journal, December 17, 2014. Retrieved December 20, 2014 from http://www.wsj.com/articles/BL-CJB-25307 []

Sebastien Goulard

Ph.D. in political science (EHESS, Paris); M.A. in social sciences (EHESS, Paris); M.A. in international relations (IRIS, Paris), B.A. (Hons) in international political studies (ESE – Nottingham Trent University)

More Posts

城鎮化新藍圖的突破與不足

On April 2, 2014, Prof. Chan published another article1 in Chinese on the lack of real breakthrough in China’s recent urbanisation plan.

自1949年起,中國始建城鄉二元體制,推行「中國式」城鎮化, 以法律、政治手段將社會、人口、勞動力等割裂成不平等的兩塊,並將戶籍制度與城鎮化緊緊綑綁。1979年前,戶籍制度將城鄉人口嚴格隔離。改革開放後,人口流動放寬,大量農民工進城打工但戶籍仍在農村,於是城市中產生一個龐大但無戶籍的「外來人口」群體,人數從1980年代初的20多萬,增至目前的2.4億,佔總人口17%。而如此龐大的「二等公民」群體將不利於社會安定

Prof Kam Wing Chan’s full article

 

  1. Kam Wing Chan  陳金永 (2014). Chengzhen hua xin lantu di tupo buzu城镇化新蓝图的突破与不足. Ming Bao明报 . April 2, 2014 []

Sebastien Goulard

Ph.D. in political science (EHESS, Paris); M.A. in social sciences (EHESS, Paris); M.A. in international relations (IRIS, Paris), B.A. (Hons) in international political studies (ESE – Nottingham Trent University)

More Posts

A road map for reforming China’s hukou system

By Prof. Kam Wing Chan (University of Washington)

  • Date: Monday, 18 November @ 7pm
  • Venue: Room Segalen, 25/F, Admiralty Centre, Tower 2, 18 Harcourt Road, Hong Kong (Admiralty MTR station, exit A)
  • Reservation & Contact: Miriam Yang
  • cefc@cefc.com.hk / tel: 2876 6910

Abstract
China’s new leadership has called for the realization of “Chinese dream” of reviving the national strength and glory. As the country enters the urban age, a critical part of the Chinese dream is the “urban dream” – the promotion of urbanization to generate household consumption to put the economy on a sustainable footing. Yet a third of the 700 million Chinese urban dwellers today are not truly “urbanized”. They are the migrant population, who do not have an urban hukou, or household registration. To accomplish real urbanization, migrant workers need to become full urban residents. That requires offering them an urban hukou with the aim of ultimately abolishing the hukou system altogether. In this talk, Prof. Kam Wing Chan outlines a proposal to phase out the hukou system in 15 years.

This seminar will be held in English.
Sebastian Veg, Director of the CEFC, will chair the session.

More information about the conference

Monique Abud

Centre d’études sur la Chine moderne et contemporaine, EHESS, Paris, France

More Posts

Undo the discriminatory hukou system to achieve ‘cities of dream’?

1. Chan, Kam Wing. 2013, February 4. Turning China’s cities with invisible walls into cities of dreams. East Asian Forum (accessed 25 April 2013).

2. Chan, Kam Wing. 2013, January 19. China’s hukou system stands in the way of its dream of prosperity. South China Morning Post (accessed 25 April 2013). [Earlier version of 1.]

1. During a widely publicised tour of Shenzhen, China, the new head of the Communist Party, Xi Jinping, called for the realisation of the ‘Chinese dream’ — a great national revival.

Shortly after that, the Chinese character meng (dream) was voted ‘character of the year’ in an online poll of 50,000 people.

As China enters the urban age, a critical part of the Chinese dream is the ‘urban dream’: the promotion of urbanisation to generate household consumption to put the economy on a sustainable footing. This would steer China away from its currentexport- and investment-driven growth model, which has long been considered, even by the government, as ‘unbalanced’ and ‘unsustainable’.

Premier-designate Li Keqiang has championed urbanisation for years. Some media pundits are excited by his talk of a new type of urbanisation, though details are scant. Can he do it right and help China reach its urban dream?

Read more

2. Dreams are in vogue in mainland China. During a widely publicised tour of Shenzhen, the new head of the Communist Party, Xi Jinping , called for the realisation of the “Chinese dream” – a great national revival. Right after that, the Chinese character meng (dream) was voted “character of the year” in an online poll of 50,000 people.

The new year also began with a political storm over a censored article dreaming of Chinese constitutional reform. Whether those dreams are more like a fantasy than realistic hope remains to be seen.

Read more

Related

  • Chan, Kam Wing. (1994) Cities with invisible walls : Reinterpreting urbanization in post-1949 China, Oxford university press, 194 p.
  • Chan, Kam Wing and Will Buckingham. (2008) Is China abolishing the hukou system? The China quarterly, 195, pp. 582-606. [Full text here]
  • 陈, 金永. 2013年05月13. 户籍改革路线图. 财新《新世纪》. [Accessed 28 May 2013].
  • 陈, 金永. 2013年06月1.十五年完成户籍改革. 财新《中国改革》. Dowload PDF here.
  • Kam Wing Chan webpage

 

Monique Abud

Centre d’études sur la Chine moderne et contemporaine, EHESS, Paris, France

More Posts